Telesales – How to Write a Cold Call Pitch Or Presentation

Writing any type of sales presentation is an art form in itself. But a cold call presentation is more difficult because you only have a very short period of time to make an impact. It’s essential that you follow a set structure in order for your sales pitch to flow like a good novel. Let me expand in this analogy; imagine buying a book that turned you off or bored you senseless within the first few pages. It’s more than likely you would stop reading it and move onto something more interesting instead. That is how a lot of companies cold call pitches are received by a vast majority of the population.

I am only going to talk about the introduction in this article, i.e. the first 30 seconds. To write about the entire process creates a very long article indeed.

3 very important things that you need to employ when writing the introduction to a cold call pitch are what I call the ’3 Biggies’.

The 3 Biggies are:

1. Who you are?
2. Why you’re calling?
3. What’s in it for them?

If you do not cover these three points in your opening gambit you stand a good chance of crashing your presentation within the first 15 seconds, this is something that I call the ‘Hello Burn’ and I will talk about that another time.

The process is simple. This is who I am and I work for this company. This is just a quick call to talk about this, and for your time I want to give you this. Voila.

Two basic examples of a simple introduction are below. I have written one for a small one man band gardening firm and one for a blue chip pension supplier. Both companies are fictitious but the idea is to show you that this straightforward process can work for a One Man Band or a Blue Chip company. Have a look at the two examples.

(Arrows indicate the upward or downward inflection of voice)

A one man band gardener.

“Good Morning/Afternoon, my name is … calling from Twigs n Tings. I know that you must be rather busy so I will only take a few moments of your time. I am a local gardener who specialises in working with gardens up to 1 acre in size. I am in the process of expanding my current client list and I would be delighted to offer you a free 1 hr consultation worth (Include your hourly rate + VAT). 9 times out of 10 I can guarantee not only improve the look of your garden, but also give you phenomenal value for money. All I need to do is just take a few minutes of your time to ask a few basic questions; is that OK? ”

A large multi national pension provider

“Good morning/afternoon, my name is … From ABC Pensions, the largest pension provider in the UK. This is just a very brief call to let you know that over the next few weeks a consultant from our area will be offering individuals the opportunity to review their current pension and see how it is actually performing in the current financial climate. This free service is comes with no obligation and may just reveal an opportunity for you to safeguard your pension. Can I just take a few moments of your time to see there is anything that we can do for you? ”

As you can see from the 2 examples above there are two very different types of client that both follow the same simple 3 Biggies rule. One important factor to take into account is to remember that this is a cold call and that you have invaded the prospects privacy. Do not just assume that because the opening paragraph that you use sounds good to you, that it will have the same appealing factors for your prospect. This is why I always recommend that you ask the client if you can take a few further moments of their time.

There are numerous reasons for this question. First of all you can ascertain if the client is at all receptive to your call and secondly you need to be able to move into the fact finding section of your presentation. Unless you already know that the prospect is right for the product or service that you supply, you must go forward and at least ask a few qualifying questions otherwise you will simply be wasting your own phone bill and paperwork, and of course the time of your potential prospect.