Frozen food – Yay or Nay?

However, according to professional chefs in their elegant men’s and women’s chef coats and bib aprons, there are some potential negative impacts of using these types of consumables that you should be aware of before you make your decision.

The pros of frozen food

While the subject is quite debatable and is hotly discussed among many, there are certain pros to using meals that have been freeze processed. These include:

Convenience: They are incredibly convenient. You can buy it pre-packaged, and all you have to do is heat it up in the oven or microwave. This is a great option for busy families who don’t have time to cook from scratch every night.
Affordability: They are often cheaper than fresh items. This can be especially helpful if you are on a tight budget.
Nutrition: Freezing fruits and vegetables can retain their nutritional value just as fresh produce. In fact, some people believe that they are even more nutrient dense because freezing is done shortly after being picked. This means that the nutrients are not lost during transport or storage like they can be with fresh produce.
Saves time: As mentioned before, one of the biggest benefits of this type of meal is that it saves time. You don’t have to spend time grocery shopping or cooking. All you have to do is heat it up in the oven or microwave. This is a great option for busy families who don’t have time to cook from scratch every night.
Durability: They can be stored for a long time without going bad. This is especially helpful if you have a large family and can’t eat all the food before it goes bad. You can just freeze it and save it for later.
Cost efficient: It is often cheaper than fresh produce. This is because these products are mass produced, which drives down the cost.
Sustainable: Another benefit of this type of meal is that it is sustainable. By freezing partially prepared meals and produce, we are able to reduce wastage and save on resources such as energy and water.

The cons of frozen food

Despite these benefits, there are some negative aspects of frozen meals that should be considered.

Less variety: One downside of these products is that there is less variety than fresh produce. Most items are processed and pre-packaged, which means that you don’t have as much control over what ingredients are used.
Not always healthy: Although most of these products are healthy, not all of it is. Some are high in sodium, sugar and fat, which can be bad for your health.
May contain additives: They often contains additives such as preservatives and coloring agents to improve the taste or appearance of the product. While these additives are generally safe, they can still be harmful if consumed in large quantities.
Not always fresh: One downside of freezing meals and produce is that it is not always fresh. Often times, meals are cooked months before it is sold in stores. This means that some of the nutrients may have been lost during the freezing process.
May contain bacteria: Another downside of these products is that it may contain bacteria. This is one of the most common reasons for food poisoning. So, it is important to make sure that it is cooked properly and stored at the correct temperature.

How to make frozen food more nutritious

Is there a way to make frozen food more nutritious? Yes! There are a few things you can do to make them more nutritious:

Cook the meals properly: Make sure that you cook them properly. Undercooking them may mean that may contain bacteria that can cause food poisoning.
Add vegetables: One way to make these meals more nutritious is by adding vegetables. Frozen vegetables are a great way to get your daily dose of vitamins and minerals.
Use organic ingredients: If you are using these meals, try to use organic ingredients as much as possible. Organic ingredients tend to be healthier than non-organic ingredients.

How to make frozen food taste better

Taste can be one of the negatives of frozen food, but there are certainly ways to make it taste better.

Add spices: One way to make these meals taste better is by adding spices. Spices can add a lot of flavor and taste to your meals and make it more enjoyable to eat.
Cook with broth: Another way to make them taste better is by cooking it in broth. The broth will add flavor to the dish and make it tastier.
Use sauces: Sauces can also add flavor to and make it more delicious. Try using different sauces, such as BBQ sauce or teriyaki sauce, when cooking them.

The best and worst frozen foods

Some of the best frozen foods out there in the market include:

Fruits: Frozen fruits are a great snack or addition to smoothies. They are healthy, delicious, and easy to eat.
Vegetables: Frozen vegetables are also a healthy option and they taste great too. Try adding them to stir fries or soups for added flavor and nutrition.
Pizza: Frozen pizza is a classic comfort food that everyone loves. There are so many different kinds of frozen pizzas available these days, so you’re sure to find one you love.

Some of the worst frozen foods include:

Dinners: Most freeze processed dinners are unhealthy and not very tasty. They are often full of sodium and other unhealthy ingredients.
Desserts: Desserts can sometimes become icy and hard when frozen. They are also often high in sugar and calories.

So, is frozen food a good or bad thing? In general, it is a good thing. It is healthy, convenient, and tasty. However, it is important to watch out for unhealthy options like desserts and dinners. Enjoying these type of meals in moderation is the key to staying healthy and happy, and who knows, once you put on a bib apron, and bring out those dishes, you could get a reputation as a culinary genius at home!

Telesales – How to Write a Cold Call Pitch Or Presentation

Writing any type of sales presentation is an art form in itself. But a cold call presentation is more difficult because you only have a very short period of time to make an impact. It’s essential that you follow a set structure in order for your sales pitch to flow like a good novel. Let me expand in this analogy; imagine buying a book that turned you off or bored you senseless within the first few pages. It’s more than likely you would stop reading it and move onto something more interesting instead. That is how a lot of companies cold call pitches are received by a vast majority of the population.

I am only going to talk about the introduction in this article, i.e. the first 30 seconds. To write about the entire process creates a very long article indeed.

3 very important things that you need to employ when writing the introduction to a cold call pitch are what I call the ’3 Biggies’.

The 3 Biggies are:

1. Who you are?
2. Why you’re calling?
3. What’s in it for them?

If you do not cover these three points in your opening gambit you stand a good chance of crashing your presentation within the first 15 seconds, this is something that I call the ‘Hello Burn’ and I will talk about that another time.

The process is simple. This is who I am and I work for this company. This is just a quick call to talk about this, and for your time I want to give you this. Voila.

Two basic examples of a simple introduction are below. I have written one for a small one man band gardening firm and one for a blue chip pension supplier. Both companies are fictitious but the idea is to show you that this straightforward process can work for a One Man Band or a Blue Chip company. Have a look at the two examples.

(Arrows indicate the upward or downward inflection of voice)

A one man band gardener.

“Good Morning/Afternoon, my name is … calling from Twigs n Tings. I know that you must be rather busy so I will only take a few moments of your time. I am a local gardener who specialises in working with gardens up to 1 acre in size. I am in the process of expanding my current client list and I would be delighted to offer you a free 1 hr consultation worth (Include your hourly rate + VAT). 9 times out of 10 I can guarantee not only improve the look of your garden, but also give you phenomenal value for money. All I need to do is just take a few minutes of your time to ask a few basic questions; is that OK? ”

A large multi national pension provider

“Good morning/afternoon, my name is … From ABC Pensions, the largest pension provider in the UK. This is just a very brief call to let you know that over the next few weeks a consultant from our area will be offering individuals the opportunity to review their current pension and see how it is actually performing in the current financial climate. This free service is comes with no obligation and may just reveal an opportunity for you to safeguard your pension. Can I just take a few moments of your time to see there is anything that we can do for you? ”

As you can see from the 2 examples above there are two very different types of client that both follow the same simple 3 Biggies rule. One important factor to take into account is to remember that this is a cold call and that you have invaded the prospects privacy. Do not just assume that because the opening paragraph that you use sounds good to you, that it will have the same appealing factors for your prospect. This is why I always recommend that you ask the client if you can take a few further moments of their time.

There are numerous reasons for this question. First of all you can ascertain if the client is at all receptive to your call and secondly you need to be able to move into the fact finding section of your presentation. Unless you already know that the prospect is right for the product or service that you supply, you must go forward and at least ask a few qualifying questions otherwise you will simply be wasting your own phone bill and paperwork, and of course the time of your potential prospect.

Be Consciously Mindful of Deception and Deceit While Negotiating

Are you consciously mindful of the perils that deception and deceit have on you and the other negotiator while negotiating? There’s a very fine line between deceit and deception. Therefore, deceit and deception have to be used cautiously, less they wreak havoc on a negotiation.

The problem with using either deceit or deception in a negotiation lies in the manner in which they are perceived. Everyone practices some form of deception when they negotiate. It can be in the form of not fully disclosing your ultimate position, not disclosing information that would detract from your position, or in a myriad of other ways. Deceit on the other hand is outright lying.

The trouble occurs when you or the other negotiator feel he’s being intentionally misled. Then, trust is broken, which causes the bonding process to become stymied, which in turn causes the negotiation to proceed less expeditiously.

If you sense “something’s not right” with information you’ve been given, or you receive quizzical inquiries stemming from information you propose when negotiating, consider the following.

1. Assess what you’re sensing.

a. Try to determine what has caused you to feel what you’re experiencing. Was it the way the information was presented? Did you or the other negotiator do ‘something’ nonverbally that caused you to perceive doubt or be perceived as doubtful, about the validity of the information presented? Once a determination is made, bring it to the forefront of the negotiation and seek clarification. At that point, observe very intently the repositioning of the point. Look for uneasiness and/or the degree the new position changes from the original one.

2. Determine how best to respond.

a. In considering how best to respond, consider how your reframed position will be viewed, or how the other negotiator reframed his position. Compare the new position to how it was perceived prior to its reframing. In particular, consider if the reframed position ‘adds value’ to the negotiation, and if so, who is advantaged by the reframing. It may be more palatable to allow the position to remain unchanged, with an explanation addressing the misperception possessed by whoever initiated the point.

3. Make sure everyone understands the revised information and they agree with it.

a. Once you’ve determined to what degree the information in contention has been addressed, be prepared to move on in the negotiation. Initially, do so cautiously and observe the demeanor of the other negotiator to seek any behavioral differences in his negotiation style. If there’s no change, assume the situation has been addressed satisfactorily.

The presentation of information in a negotiation can become tricky. Regardless of how you address the perception of deceit or deception, be sure to cast your efforts carefully, because those efforts will become the source of your negotiation prosperity… and everything will be right with the world.

The Negotiation Tips Are…

· If you perceive deceit or are perceived as being deceitful, address it sooner versus later in the negotiation. You will only enhance your position be doing so.

· Deceit can be concealed in deception. Like in any negotiation, sometimes you have to rearrange what you see, in order to view the situation for what it is.

· No one is perfect and everyone makes mistakes. When you’re negotiating, determine to what degree a mistake is just that, versus deceit, before acting upon information.