Telesales – How to Write a Cold Call Pitch Or Presentation

Writing any type of sales presentation is an art form in itself. But a cold call presentation is more difficult because you only have a very short period of time to make an impact. It’s essential that you follow a set structure in order for your sales pitch to flow like a good novel. Let me expand in this analogy; imagine buying a book that turned you off or bored you senseless within the first few pages. It’s more than likely you would stop reading it and move onto something more interesting instead. That is how a lot of companies cold call pitches are received by a vast majority of the population.

I am only going to talk about the introduction in this article, i.e. the first 30 seconds. To write about the entire process creates a very long article indeed.

3 very important things that you need to employ when writing the introduction to a cold call pitch are what I call the ’3 Biggies’.

The 3 Biggies are:

1. Who you are?
2. Why you’re calling?
3. What’s in it for them?

If you do not cover these three points in your opening gambit you stand a good chance of crashing your presentation within the first 15 seconds, this is something that I call the ‘Hello Burn’ and I will talk about that another time.

The process is simple. This is who I am and I work for this company. This is just a quick call to talk about this, and for your time I want to give you this. Voila.

Two basic examples of a simple introduction are below. I have written one for a small one man band gardening firm and one for a blue chip pension supplier. Both companies are fictitious but the idea is to show you that this straightforward process can work for a One Man Band or a Blue Chip company. Have a look at the two examples.

(Arrows indicate the upward or downward inflection of voice)

A one man band gardener.

“Good Morning/Afternoon, my name is … calling from Twigs n Tings. I know that you must be rather busy so I will only take a few moments of your time. I am a local gardener who specialises in working with gardens up to 1 acre in size. I am in the process of expanding my current client list and I would be delighted to offer you a free 1 hr consultation worth (Include your hourly rate + VAT). 9 times out of 10 I can guarantee not only improve the look of your garden, but also give you phenomenal value for money. All I need to do is just take a few minutes of your time to ask a few basic questions; is that OK? ”

A large multi national pension provider

“Good morning/afternoon, my name is … From ABC Pensions, the largest pension provider in the UK. This is just a very brief call to let you know that over the next few weeks a consultant from our area will be offering individuals the opportunity to review their current pension and see how it is actually performing in the current financial climate. This free service is comes with no obligation and may just reveal an opportunity for you to safeguard your pension. Can I just take a few moments of your time to see there is anything that we can do for you? ”

As you can see from the 2 examples above there are two very different types of client that both follow the same simple 3 Biggies rule. One important factor to take into account is to remember that this is a cold call and that you have invaded the prospects privacy. Do not just assume that because the opening paragraph that you use sounds good to you, that it will have the same appealing factors for your prospect. This is why I always recommend that you ask the client if you can take a few further moments of their time.

There are numerous reasons for this question. First of all you can ascertain if the client is at all receptive to your call and secondly you need to be able to move into the fact finding section of your presentation. Unless you already know that the prospect is right for the product or service that you supply, you must go forward and at least ask a few qualifying questions otherwise you will simply be wasting your own phone bill and paperwork, and of course the time of your potential prospect.

Be Consciously Mindful of Deception and Deceit While Negotiating

Are you consciously mindful of the perils that deception and deceit have on you and the other negotiator while negotiating? There’s a very fine line between deceit and deception. Therefore, deceit and deception have to be used cautiously, less they wreak havoc on a negotiation.

The problem with using either deceit or deception in a negotiation lies in the manner in which they are perceived. Everyone practices some form of deception when they negotiate. It can be in the form of not fully disclosing your ultimate position, not disclosing information that would detract from your position, or in a myriad of other ways. Deceit on the other hand is outright lying.

The trouble occurs when you or the other negotiator feel he’s being intentionally misled. Then, trust is broken, which causes the bonding process to become stymied, which in turn causes the negotiation to proceed less expeditiously.

If you sense “something’s not right” with information you’ve been given, or you receive quizzical inquiries stemming from information you propose when negotiating, consider the following.

1. Assess what you’re sensing.

a. Try to determine what has caused you to feel what you’re experiencing. Was it the way the information was presented? Did you or the other negotiator do ‘something’ nonverbally that caused you to perceive doubt or be perceived as doubtful, about the validity of the information presented? Once a determination is made, bring it to the forefront of the negotiation and seek clarification. At that point, observe very intently the repositioning of the point. Look for uneasiness and/or the degree the new position changes from the original one.

2. Determine how best to respond.

a. In considering how best to respond, consider how your reframed position will be viewed, or how the other negotiator reframed his position. Compare the new position to how it was perceived prior to its reframing. In particular, consider if the reframed position ‘adds value’ to the negotiation, and if so, who is advantaged by the reframing. It may be more palatable to allow the position to remain unchanged, with an explanation addressing the misperception possessed by whoever initiated the point.

3. Make sure everyone understands the revised information and they agree with it.

a. Once you’ve determined to what degree the information in contention has been addressed, be prepared to move on in the negotiation. Initially, do so cautiously and observe the demeanor of the other negotiator to seek any behavioral differences in his negotiation style. If there’s no change, assume the situation has been addressed satisfactorily.

The presentation of information in a negotiation can become tricky. Regardless of how you address the perception of deceit or deception, be sure to cast your efforts carefully, because those efforts will become the source of your negotiation prosperity… and everything will be right with the world.

The Negotiation Tips Are…

· If you perceive deceit or are perceived as being deceitful, address it sooner versus later in the negotiation. You will only enhance your position be doing so.

· Deceit can be concealed in deception. Like in any negotiation, sometimes you have to rearrange what you see, in order to view the situation for what it is.

· No one is perfect and everyone makes mistakes. When you’re negotiating, determine to what degree a mistake is just that, versus deceit, before acting upon information.

Why Be Pre-Occupied? “Just Being Present” – Part 2

Being in the lion’s pit of life is interesting at times, isn’t it? This is real tongue-in-cheek stuff. One day or even one afternoon can present so many opportunities to become waylaid with worries, fears and anxieties… enough to last the rest of the day, and into the next, easy!

But, this is where control over the mind and our mental processes can come to our rescue.

Recently, I had the privilege of reading an extraordinary piece of wisdom titled, “Practicing awareness in everyday life.”[1] It’s all about the subject of awareness; the skill of staying in the present. The author says it’s the most important skill that we could acquire.

The issue is about how much of our awake time we spend partially or completely distracted from our present activities, because we’re focused on the past or future–”neither of which exist.”

As we experience life, there are so many things that have just gone or are about to hit us that consume our ordinary thinking. This leaves us drained of the attention we could place in the present. No wonder we struggle to listen to people properly half the time.

This subject is all about staying ‘in the truth.’ It’s about sticking with our senses and what they tell us to feel, in the moment. We’re told to focus, particularly around decision-making, on what we’re actually thinking, feeling, saying and doing–that is, we need to be intimately aware of ourselves.

Even simple tasks such as brushing our teeth should require all our ‘manual’ attention. The objective here is to train the mind to think manually, and resist our preponderance to go into mental autopilot. We should “practise awareness until we can operate ‘automatically on manual’, so we can choose to ‘manually go to automatic’.”

What this means is once we’re trained to be aware at will, we then have the ability to become more competent over our attitudes; we become ‘attitudinally competent.’ We can then screen out the unhelpful emotional distractions, scheduling our focus on these for times when we wish to deliberately reflect on the past and plan for the future. We effectively hold the moment (emotionally) and deal with it at a predetermined time later.

We should become adept at being a silent observer of ourselves, being attuned to our thoughts, feelings, words and actions. There is no more basic a goal for a person to have than to become self-aware, and that continually so.

We must resist allowing our minds to wander and meander in undisciplined ways; sure, when we watch a movie and want to relax, a free mind is fine; but truly, do we think an unfocused mind dribbling through the immediate past or near future is helpful? It can’t possibly be and “running of ‘old part-fiction movies’ is insanity.”

Reflection and planning must be restricted to “fully truthful” aspects. We need to determine what truth there is, sifting out the innuendo and assumptions.

So, let’s get to work on not being pre-occupied mentally and simply stay in the moment practicing awareness. Even during so-called stressful times, we’ll benefit from the fresh perspective and strength that comes as a result.